Home / Lifestyle / 11 Animals That Are Going Extinct This Very Minute

11 Animals That Are Going Extinct This Very Minute

Have you noticed that the sparrow, a bird that once could be spotted all over the city is now a rare sight? The friendly chirp that once filled the air is now a rarity.

And it’s not an isolated case. It’s happening to sparrows in the city and to the tigers in the jungles. The Living Planet Index (LPI) shows a 52 percent decline between 1970 and 2010, stating that biodiversity has declined massively in the last 35 years.

And it’s us humans who are to blame. We have killed them, used them, and exploited them for our own needs.

Here’s a list of animals that we are on the verge of losing due to what we have done to the planet:

1. Vaquita

wildfor

wildfor

Predominantly found in the Gulf of California, the Vaquita is the world’s rarest marine mammal. A porpoise, this animal was not discovered until 1958 and just a few years after that, it touched the line of extinction.

Illegal fishing and debris in the sea are taking its life away.

2. Mountain Gorilla

wwf

wwf

Another animal so commonly found and seen in the movies, the Mountain Gorilla is one of the two subspecies of the eastern gorilla and an extremely rare animal that suffers massive threat from poaching, habitat destruction, and disease.

They can only be found in just two places in the world: Central Africa and Uganda.

3. Amur Leopard

altaconservation

altaconservation

This member of the cat dynasty is a very rare and critically endangered leopard that has adapted to life in the temperate forests of Southeast Russia and Northeast China. As per data that was collected in 2015, there are less than 60 in the world today.

 4. Glaucous Macaw

birdbreedscentral

birdbreedscentral

Don’t Miss

Another gorgeous animal that’s a large neotropical parrot is already extinct now. They were last recorded in 1960 and are considered to non-existent; however, some claim that they are there somewhere in the deep jungles of South America.

5. Great Indian Bustard

Youtube

Youtube

Weighing more than 18 kg, the great Indian Bustard is undoubtedly one of the heaviest flying birds and we are losing them because of change in habitat system and poaching. The decimated population has reached a point where there are just 200 of them left in India and Pakistan.

6. Florida Panther

Typepad

Typepad

These Panthers have been idealised in several cartoon and movies, but let’s take a minute to know how they are doing in real life. The species is now endangered and there only just 20 of them in the wild. The recent headcount tells us that there has been an increase in number, but the big cat still faces countless challenges in its fight for survival.

7. Angonoka Tortoise

ThoughtCO

ThoughtCO

Native to Madagascar, the land of diversity, the Angonoka Tortoise is easily the most endangered tortoise in the world. They are only found in certain regions of Northwest Madagascar. They are poached and killed for their distinctive look and beautifully decorated carapace.

8. Singapore Stream Crab

wrscomsg

wrscomsg

Discovered just recently in 1986, the Singapore stream crab are found in the live streams of Singapore and are going extinct due to rapid urbanization. Locals often hunt them as food. They only reach about 3 cm in width.

9. Madagascan Fish Eagle

Wiki Commons

Wiki Commons

Another gem from Madagascar, the Fish Eagle is a bird of prey. Close to 63 cm long, their population is in rapid decline as they are threatened by habitat destruction and persecution. The current wild population of this bird in the wild is estimated to be around 120 breeding pairs.  

10. Mexican Wolf

LA Times

LA Times

Also known as “el lobo”, this they roved in thousands across the Unites States. However, the rapid change brought about by urbanisation and too much intervention by humans in their habitat, has seen their population dwindling. To keep them safe, a small group of Mexican wolves was released back into the wild in Arizona from the zoo.

11. California Condor

La Times

La Times

A majestic North American bird, the condor has a wingspan of 3 m. It’s a new world vulture and arguably the largest; sadly, it became extinct in the wild in 1987. Their numbers drastically declined in the 20th century due to poaching, lead poisoning, and habitat destruction. The condor is a significant bird to many Californian Native American groups and plays an important role in several of their traditional myths.

Can we say that better preservation of the earth we were given could have saved these animals? Can we say that our poaching and unhealthy intervening habits have killed so many species that it’s difficult to get them back now? Can we say that if not the past, we are willing to change the future with our actions?

Can we?

News credit : Indiatimes

Check Also

People Have To Wait 2 Hours Before Being Able To ‘Use’ The 18-Karat-Gold Toilet At Guggenheim Museum

It’s World Toilet Day and what a better way to start the day than with …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *