Home / News / Hillary Clinton Avoids Direct Reference to Comey Memos in Speech

Hillary Clinton Avoids Direct Reference to Comey Memos in Speech

Photo

“We have a president who seems to reject the role of a free press in our democracy,” Hillary Clinton said on Sunday at PEN America’s World Voices Festival.

Credit
Karsten Moran for The New York Times

In her first public appearance since James B. Comey, the former F.B.I. director, began his book tour, Hillary Clinton made only a glancing reference to him in a speech on Sunday night and instead focused most of her attacks on President Trump, once again likening him to authoritarians.

Mrs. Clinton gave the Arthur Miller Freedom to Write Lecture at PEN America’s World Voices Festival in New York City. She spoke at length about threats to journalists around the world before turning her attention to domestic matters. She criticized Mr. Trump, not so subtly comparing him to authoritarian leaders who had suppressed journalism in their countries.

“Today, we have a president who seems to reject the role of a free press in our democracy,” she said. “Although obsessed with his own press coverage, he evaluates it based not on whether it provides knowledge or understanding, but solely on whether the daily coverage helps him and hurts his opponents.”

After listing more examples of Mr. Trump’s attacks on the news media, Mrs. Clinton said, “Now given his track record, is it any surprise that, according to the latest round of revelations, he joked about throwing reporters in jail to make them ‘talk’?”

She was referring to the newly declassified memos that Mr. Comey kept, recounting his private conversations with Mr. Trump.

Photo

The writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie asked Mrs. Clinton if she had fought back enough during the presidential campaign. Mrs. Clinton conceded that she had not.

Credit
Karsten Moran for The New York Times

According to those notes, Mr. Comey and Mr. Trump agreed that those who leaked classified information should be aggressively prosecuted. Mr. Comey said he was in favor of “putting a head on a pike as a message.”

Continue reading the main story

News credit : Nytimes